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New Report Tracks Environmental Justice Movement Over Five Decades

This Tuesday February 11 will mark the twentieth anniversary of the Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898 signed by President Bill Clinton. Environmental justice leaders from all across the country will commemorate the historic signing of the Executive Order with mixed emotions. A team of researcher at Texas Southern University will release a new report, “Environmental Justice Timeline and Milestones, 1964-2014,” that tracks the Environmental Justice Movement over the past five decades, beginning with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The vast majority of environmental justice leaders two decades ago preferred to have environmental justice codified in law. However, that did not happen. They recognize the Environmental Justice Movement did not start with the Executive Order nor was it driven by government action. The 20-year commemoration is a time for grassroots-led movement leaders to reflect on how far they have come and where they are going.

School near refineries in Manchester-Houston Texas, Photo by Bryan Parras of TEJAS

Chemical Facility Safety and Security Actions Needed to Protect Workers and Communities

Following the aftermath of the April 2013 ammonium nitrate explosion in West, Texas that killed 15 people, injured another 160 persons, and damaged or destroyed more than 150 buildings, President Obama signed Executive Order 13650 (EO). The EO outlines measures that can be taken by the federal government utilizing existing regulatory authority to enhance safety and security in coordination with chemical facility owners and operators.