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“Dumping in Dixie” Turns 25

“Dumping in Dixie,” the first book to chronicle environmental justice struggles in the United States, turns 25. Although the book dealt with black communities in the South fighting against the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow segregation, residential apartheid and environmental racism, over the last quarter century “Dumping in Dixie” environmental justice framing has translated to larger race and class struggles in the United States and around the world.

Cover of Race, Place and Environmental Justice After Hurricane Katrina

Katrina and the Second Disaster: A 20-Point Plan to Destroy Black New Orleans Revisited After 10 Years

This August 29 will mark the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Now is a good time to revisit Katrina and the Second Disaster: A Twenty-Point Plan to Destroy Black New Orleans, a blog I wrote months after the disaster. Now after ten years, Katrina watchers, experts, urban planners, funders, government and nongovernment organizations, and community leaders point to some shocking statistics and trends: smaller African American footprint, rising income inequality, uptick in black child poverty, shortage of low-income housing, skyrocketing apartment rents, rampant housing discrimination, runaway neighborhood gentrification, and overall uneven recovery. While these outcomes are alarming, they should be no surprise given the array of decade-long policies built on preexisting racial inequality that preceded the 2005 storm. If you rebuild on inequality, you can expect more inequality—not less inequality.

Women of Color Award EJ Summit II 2002

After People’s Climate March, Good Time to Diversify Funding of Climate Justice

In order for the nation to make headway on the climate change front, we need our mainstream environmental organization friends and philanthropic allies who supported the People’s Climate March to join us in supporting the recommendations for diversifying funding and building an infrastructure of “grassroots” efforts, ethnic-based networks, and regional environmental and climate initiatives—better known as a Movement. That’s how we put together a winning team to effectively battle climate change, social vulnerability and build community resilience.

Houston Westpark Recycling Center

Houston’s One Bin Waste Recycling Plan Advisory Committee Lacks Diversity

Non-Hispanic Whites make up only 26 percent of Houston. Yet, the city’s controversial One Bin for All recycling plan advisory committee is 80 percent white. It is hard to imagine how the nearly all-white One Bin committee can move forward in any credible way without the Mayor “fixing” the glaring omission of Hispanics on the advisory committee. This is not an insignificant point since Hispanics currently make up nearly half of the city’s population.

President Clinton Signs Environmental Justice Executive Order in White House Oval Office, Washington, DC 1994

State of the Environmental Justice Executive Order After 20 Years

What is the state of the Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations,” after two decades and three U.S. presidents? Environmental justice leaders in 2014 will commemorate the Executive Order and work on action plans to ensure its full implementation. 

Environmental Justice Leaders Hold Press Briefing at the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa, 2001

An Action Plan for Advancing Environmental Justice

The Environmental Justice Movement is confronted with many old and new challenges.The movement has made tremendous gains over the past four decades as documented in Environmental Health and Racial Equity in the United States: Building Environmentally Just, Sustainable and Livable Communities, a 2011 book publishedby the American Public Health Association Press (APHA) and the W.K….

Earth Day 2013: Call for Environmental Justice Milestones

This announcement is a national “Call for Environmental Justice Milestones” (2012-2013) to be released as part of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU) Earth Day 2013 celebration. Submissions will need to include hyperlinks. In keeping with tradition, the new milestone entries will be added to the previous EJ…

Call for Papers Focuses on Black Houston Over Past Three Decades

The Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU) is calling for papers for its Invisible Houston Revisited Three Decades Later: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust Policy Summit and Book Project. The initiative follows up Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust(Texas A&M University Press 1987)…