Why African Americans Need a Strong and Independent Federal EPA

Numerous studies have documented African Americans communities face a disproportionate share of environmental and health threats. It is for this simple reason the Environmental Justice Movement was born some three decades ago—a national movement born fighting environmental racism. Millions of African Americans look to the federal Environmental Protection Agency for equal environmental protection they have been denied by their state environmental agencies, many of whom have a long and sordid history of protecting polluters over protecting residents who live in industrial “sacrifice zones.” A weakened federal EPA is a recipe for disaster. Rolling-back or gutting environmental regulations is a roadmap for more trips to the emergency room for many Americans who live on the fenceline with polluting industries. We must resist all efforts to dismantle EPA and our nation’s environmental protection apparatus as if our lives depend upon on it—and they do.

HBCU Climate Change Consortium Planning Next Stop COP21 in Paris

Dillard University and Texas Southern University convened the Third Annual HBCU Student Climate Change Conference in New Orleans on March 26-29. More than 200 students and faculty mentors from 19 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and community based organization leaders attended the four-day event. Consortium members developed a 6-month fund-raising plan to ensure a diverse number of students/faculty mentors and CBO leaders engage in on-the-ground activities leading up to the United Nations COP21 in Paris, France November 30 thru December 11, 2015.

MLK Day 2014: Honor Dr. King by Fighting for Environmental Justice

In 1986 Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established as a U.S. federal holiday and is celebrated across the nation. The federal holiday is held on the third Monday of January and is seen as a day for Americans to promote equal rights and justice for all, regardless of their background, and to volunteer their time in some civic action groups.

State of the Environmental Justice Executive Order After 20 Years

What is the state of the Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations,” after two decades and three U.S. presidents? Environmental justice leaders in 2014 will commemorate the Executive Order and work on action plans to ensure its full implementation. 

Invisible Houston Revisited Policy Summit Rolled Out

The Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University rolled out the Invisible Houston Revisited webpage for its Policy Summit to be held on campus November 7, 2013. The one-day Summit focuses on various forms of inequality in the nation’s fourth largest city over the past three decades since research on my…

Thirteen Environmental Justice Resolutions for 2013

The Environmental Justice Movement has made tremendous progress over the past three decades, rising from local isolated struggles across the United States to become a global movement. Here are thirteen resolutions offered to grow, strengthen and empower the EJ Movement in 2013 and beyond. Strategy 1:  Assist organizations build economically vibrant and socially just communities…

Connecting the Dots Between Transportation and Public Health

The U.S. has over 136 million cars, 110 million trucks, and about 1 million buses for a total of 247 million registered vehicles accounting for nearly 70 percent of our oil use and more than 65 percent of that amount is for personal vehicles. This accounts for almost one-third of the world’s vehicles. Car ownership…