50-Member HBCU Delegation to Attend United Nations COP21 Climate Summit in Paris

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Climate Change Consortium is sending a delegation of 50 student leaders and faculty mentors to the United Nations COP21 Climate Summit in Paris. The summit runs from November 30 to December 11, 2015 and will bring together more than 125 world leaders, international organizations and civil society to discuss plans to achieve a new international agreement on the climate. The HBCU COP21 delegation includes 15 schools in states stretching from Texas to Pennsylvania.

Human Rights and Civil Rights Tribunal to Be Held at Selma Commemoration March 7

A coalition of environmental and climate justice and civil rights leaders will hold a tribunal in Selma, AL on Saturday March 7 as part of the 50th Anniversary Commemoration of Jubilee Bridge Crossing. The tribunal will feature the testimonies of leaders from communities from across Alabama who will speak with jurists from around the country who are experienced in achieving environmental justice victories. The theme of the tribunal is “Change Is Gonna Come: Advancing an Environmental and Climate Justice Agenda in the South.” A strategy session will also be held to map out a “southern initiative” on climate justice.

HBCUs and Frontline Gulf Coast Communities to Hold “Teach-In” at NYC Climate Convergence

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Climate Initiative, a consortium of black colleges and community based organizations in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states, will hold a “teach-in” at the Global Climate Convergence at 10:45am – 12:15pm, September 20 (Empire State College, 325 Hudson Street, Room 544, New York, NY). The theme of the teach-in, “Building a Strong U.S. “Southern Initiative” to Address Climate Change and Community Resilience,” emphasizes educating and training leaders from low-wealth and people of color communities in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states about the causes, impacts and consequences of climate change, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and effective models for building and enhancing community resilience to disasters.

Why HBCUs Must Lead on Climate Justice

The nation’s 104 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) play a significant role in training African Americans and other leaders of color in all fields. More than 80 percent of the HBCUs are found in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic region of the United States. Many southern communities where HBCUs are located and where they draw the vast majority of their students are at ground zero in the fight for climate justice. Climate-related disasters in the southern U.S. have outnumbered those in other regions of the U.S. annually in both scale and magnitude by a ratio of almost 4:1 during the past decade. The southern region is vulnerable not only because of its physical location and but also because of its high prevalence of concentrated poverty, uninsured households, income and wealth inequality, health care disparities, and food insecurity, combined to create a perfect storm of vulnerability if and when natural and human-made disasters strike. Given the region’s unique history, a “southern initiative” is needed to address climate vulnerability and develop strategies for building just and resilient communities.

HBCU Climate Education Partnership Launched at TSU

HOUSTON, TX — The Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU), the nation’s third largest public HBCU, was recently awarded a $150,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to support the planning of a Climate Education Community University Partnership (CECUP), a consortium of public and private Historically Black Colleges and…