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equal protection

February 09, 2014

New Report Tracks Environmental Justice Movement Over Five Decades

This Tuesday February 11 will mark the twentieth anniversary of the Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898 signed by President Bill Clinton. Environmental justice leaders from all across the country will commemorate the historic signing of the Executive Order with mixed emotions. A team of researcher at Texas Southern University will release a new report, “Environmental Justice Timeline and Milestones, 1964-2014,” that tracks the Environmental Justice Movement over the past five decades, beginning with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The vast majority of environmental justice leaders two decades ago preferred to have environmental justice codified in law. However, that did not happen. They recognize the Environmental Justice Movement did not start with the Executive Order nor was it driven by government action. The 20-year commemoration is a time for grassroots-led movement leaders to reflect on how far they have come and where they are going.

January 01, 2014

State of the Environmental Justice Executive Order After 20 Years

What is the state of the Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations,” after two decades and three U.S. presidents? Environmental justice leaders in 2014 will commemorate the Executive Order and work on action plans to ensure its full implementation. 

October 27, 2012

Principles of Environmental Justice Turn 21

It was twenty-one years ago today that the Principles of Environmental Justice were adopted on October 27, 1991 at the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, held in Washington, DC.The EJ Summit, attended by well over 1,000 delegates, was probably the single most important event in the Environmental Justice Movement’s history. Participants came

May 18, 2011

Six Months After “Call to Action” to EPA Region 4, EJ Groups Anxiously Wait for Status Report

It has now been six months since the historic November 10, 2010 meeting with Gwen Keyes Fleming, the first African American to head EPA Region 4 (which includes eight southern states, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and 6 Tribal Nations), where more than three dozen environmental justice, civil rights, faith,