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environmental justice

September 15, 2014

After People’s Climate March, Good Time to Diversify Funding of Climate Justice

In order for the nation to make headway on the climate change front, we need our mainstream environmental organization friends and philanthropic allies who supported the People’s Climate March to join us in supporting the recommendations for diversifying funding and building an infrastructure of “grassroots” efforts, ethnic-based networks, and regional environmental and climate initiatives—better known as a Movement. That’s how we put together a winning team to effectively battle climate change, social vulnerability and build community resilience.

September 05, 2014

Why HBCUs Must Lead on Climate Justice

The nation’s 104 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) play a significant role in training African Americans and other leaders of color in all fields. More than 80 percent of the HBCUs are found in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic region of the United States. Many southern communities where HBCUs are located and where they draw the vast majority of their students are at ground zero in the fight for climate justice. Climate-related disasters in the southern U.S. have outnumbered those in other regions of the U.S. annually in both scale and magnitude by a ratio of almost 4:1 during the past decade. The southern region is vulnerable not only because of its physical location and but also because of its high prevalence of concentrated poverty, uninsured households, income and wealth inequality, health care disparities, and food insecurity, combined to create a perfect storm of vulnerability if and when natural and human-made disasters strike. Given the region’s unique history, a “southern initiative” is needed to address climate vulnerability and develop strategies for building just and resilient communities.

August 26, 2014

Houston’s One Bin Waste Recycling Plan Advisory Committee Lacks Diversity

Non-Hispanic Whites make up only 26 percent of Houston. Yet, the city’s controversial One Bin for All recycling plan advisory committee is 80 percent white. It is hard to imagine how the nearly all-white One Bin committee can move forward in any credible way without the Mayor “fixing” the glaring omission of Hispanics on the advisory committee. This is not an insignificant point since Hispanics currently make up nearly half of the city’s population.

August 22, 2014

An Environmental Justice Analysis of Houston’s One Bin for All Recycling Plan

A detailed presentation examines the environmental justice implications of the One Bin for All plan in the context of Houston’s discriminatory waste facility siting pattern. From the 1970s to present, in no-zoning Houston, the city’s black and brown neighborhoods were “unofficially zoned for garbage.”

August 04, 2014

Houston Waste Summit Experts to Mayor: “Dump Experimental One-Bin Recycling Plan”

The Waste and Environmental Justice Summit was held this past Saturday at the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University. More than one hundred community and civic leaders attended the policy summit to hear from experts on recycling, waste and race, environmental justice and Houston’s controversial One Bin for All Recycling Plan.

August 03, 2014

Three-Day EPA Environmental Justice Training Workshop Kicks Off in Houston on August 6

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 will conduct an Environmental Justice Training Workshop in Houston on August 6-8 for local leaders in the Houston Metro region. The three-day workshop is co-sponsored by Houston-based Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Service (T.E.J.A.S.) and the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University.

August 03, 2014

EPA to Hold August 5 Public Hearing on Refinery Emissions and Fenceline Communities

Because of growing concern about emissions from refineries and the potential health impact on nearby “fenceline” community residents, the EPA is holding a series of public hearings around the country. It will hold a hearing on Tuesday August 5 in Houston on the Proposed Petroleum Refinery Sector Risk and Technology Review and New Source Performance Standards.

July 31, 2014

Sierra Club Creates Dr. Robert Bullard Environmental Justice Award

The Board of Directors of the National Sierra Club announced on Tuesday July 29 it had created the Dr. Robert Bullard Environmental Justice Award to be given annually to an individual or group that has done outstanding work in the area of environmental justice.

July 22, 2014

Houston to Host Three Major Environmental Justice Events in August

Houston will be hosting three important environmental justice events during the first week of August. All of the meetings will address the disproportionate location of industrial polluting facilities and toxic dumping on low-income and people of color communities and the potential health effects. The Houston “petropolis” (with its no-zoning policy) provides a perfect case study for examining how environmental decision making over the years—with the absence of an equity and justice lens—placed low-wealth and people of color neighborhoods on the frontline of environmental assault and thus exposed them to elevated health risks. The Environmental Justice Movement has set a course to reverse and correct these past mistakes and prevent them from happening in the future.

July 20, 2014

Houston’s People of Color Neighborhoods “Unofficially Zoned” for Garbage

Zero Waste Houston Coalition will hold an Environmental Justice and Waste Summit on Saturday August 2 at the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University in Houston. The Summit organizers include local and national leaders who will present strategies to address race, waste and environmental justice issues in Houston. The Summit will bring special attention to Houston’s controversial “One Bin for All” trash recycling proposal which presents social environmental challenges by giving preference to siting a new waste facility in people of color neighborhoods. After more than three decades. some Houston residents may have to once again confront environmental racism.