Women of Color Award EJ Summit II 2002

After People’s Climate March, Good Time to Diversify Funding of Climate Justice

In order for the nation to make headway on the climate change front, we need our mainstream environmental organization friends and philanthropic allies who supported the People’s Climate March to join us in supporting the recommendations for diversifying funding and building an infrastructure of “grassroots” efforts, ethnic-based networks, and regional environmental and climate initiatives—better known as a Movement. That’s how we put together a winning team to effectively battle climate change, social vulnerability and build community resilience.

HBCU Student Climate Conference Dillard U_April_ 2014

HBCUs and Frontline Gulf Coast Communities to Hold “Teach-In” at NYC Climate Convergence

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Climate Initiative, a consortium of black colleges and community based organizations in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states, will hold a “teach-in” at the Global Climate Convergence at 10:45am – 12:15pm, September 20 (Empire State College, 325 Hudson Street, Room 544, New York, NY). The theme of the teach-in, “Building a Strong U.S. “Southern Initiative” to Address Climate Change and Community Resilience,” emphasizes educating and training leaders from low-wealth and people of color communities in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states about the causes, impacts and consequences of climate change, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and effective models for building and enhancing community resilience to disasters.

Teas Southern University Campus Entrance

Why HBCUs Must Lead on Climate Justice

The nation’s 104 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) play a significant role in training African Americans and other leaders of color in all fields. More than 80 percent of the HBCUs are found in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic region of the United States. Many southern communities where HBCUs are located and where they draw the vast majority of their students are at ground zero in the fight for climate justice. Climate-related disasters in the southern U.S. have outnumbered those in other regions of the U.S. annually in both scale and magnitude by a ratio of almost 4:1 during the past decade. The southern region is vulnerable not only because of its physical location and but also because of its high prevalence of concentrated poverty, uninsured households, income and wealth inequality, health care disparities, and food insecurity, combined to create a perfect storm of vulnerability if and when natural and human-made disasters strike. Given the region’s unique history, a “southern initiative” is needed to address climate vulnerability and develop strategies for building just and resilient communities.

Dr. Beverly Wright presents Damu Smith Award to Professor Paul Mohai April 2014

UM Professor Paul Mohai Receives Damu Smith Power of One Leadership Award

Longtime environmental justice scholar, researcher and professor Paul Mohai was presented the 2014 Damu Smith Power of One Leadership Award this past weekend at the Second Annual HBCU Student Climate Change Conference held at Dillard University in New Orleans April 17-19. Professor Mohai is a professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan where he co-founded the Environmental Justice Program in the mid-1990s.

Texas Southern University students

Second Annual HBCU Climate Change Conference Kicks Off in New Orleans

The Second Annual HBCU Climate Change Student Conference kicks off today and runs through Saturday April 19 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The conference is hosted by Dillard University Deep South Center for Environmental Justice and Texas Southern University Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs. All sessions are held on the Dillard campus except for the community tour that begins on Thursday afternoon.

Entrance to Texas Southern University Campus

HBCU Climate Education Partnership Launched at TSU

HOUSTON, TX — The Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU), the nation’s third largest public HBCU, was recently awarded a $150,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to support the planning of a Climate Education Community University Partnership (CECUP), a consortium of public and private Historically Black Colleges and…