Why African Americans Need a Strong and Independent Federal EPA

Numerous studies have documented African Americans communities face a disproportionate share of environmental and health threats. It is for this simple reason the Environmental Justice Movement was born some three decades ago—a national movement born fighting environmental racism. Millions of African Americans look to the federal Environmental Protection Agency for equal environmental protection they have been denied by their state environmental agencies, many of whom have a long and sordid history of protecting polluters over protecting residents who live in industrial “sacrifice zones.” A weakened federal EPA is a recipe for disaster. Rolling-back or gutting environmental regulations is a roadmap for more trips to the emergency room for many Americans who live on the fenceline with polluting industries. We must resist all efforts to dismantle EPA and our nation’s environmental protection apparatus as if our lives depend upon on it—and they do.

Human Rights and Civil Rights Tribunal to Be Held at Selma Commemoration March 7

A coalition of environmental and climate justice and civil rights leaders will hold a tribunal in Selma, AL on Saturday March 7 as part of the 50th Anniversary Commemoration of Jubilee Bridge Crossing. The tribunal will feature the testimonies of leaders from communities from across Alabama who will speak with jurists from around the country who are experienced in achieving environmental justice victories. The theme of the tribunal is “Change Is Gonna Come: Advancing an Environmental and Climate Justice Agenda in the South.” A strategy session will also be held to map out a “southern initiative” on climate justice.

Call for Papers Focuses on Black Houston Over Past Three Decades

The Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU) is calling for papers for its Invisible Houston Revisited Three Decades Later: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust Policy Summit and Book Project. The initiative follows up Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust(Texas A&M University Press 1987)…

20-Point Plan to Depopulate Black Atlanta

Atlanta is often affectionately called the “Black Mecca” of the South. The city has undergone a dramatic demographic shift over the past four decades. Black Atlanta is shrinking.Twenty major trends, a “20-Point Plan,” account for the depopulation of Black Atlanta. Many of these trends are detailed in The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century, a…