• drrobertbullard@gmail.com

african americans

September 08, 2014

HBCUs and Frontline Gulf Coast Communities to Hold “Teach-In” at NYC Climate Convergence

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Climate Initiative, a consortium of black colleges and community based organizations in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states, will hold a “teach-in” at the Global Climate Convergence at 10:45am – 12:15pm, September 20 (Empire State College, 325 Hudson Street, Room 544, New York, NY). The theme of the teach-in, “Building a Strong U.S. “Southern Initiative” to Address Climate Change and Community Resilience,” emphasizes educating and training leaders from low-wealth and people of color communities in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic states about the causes, impacts and consequences of climate change, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and effective models for building and enhancing community resilience to disasters.

September 05, 2014

Why HBCUs Must Lead on Climate Justice

The nation’s 104 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) play a significant role in training African Americans and other leaders of color in all fields. More than 80 percent of the HBCUs are found in the Gulf Coast and South Atlantic region of the United States. Many southern communities where HBCUs are located and where they draw the vast majority of their students are at ground zero in the fight for climate justice. Climate-related disasters in the southern U.S. have outnumbered those in other regions of the U.S. annually in both scale and magnitude by a ratio of almost 4:1 during the past decade. The southern region is vulnerable not only because of its physical location and but also because of its high prevalence of concentrated poverty, uninsured households, income and wealth inequality, health care disparities, and food insecurity, combined to create a perfect storm of vulnerability if and when natural and human-made disasters strike. Given the region’s unique history, a “southern initiative” is needed to address climate vulnerability and develop strategies for building just and resilient communities.

August 26, 2014

Houston’s One Bin Waste Recycling Plan Advisory Committee Lacks Diversity

Non-Hispanic Whites make up only 26 percent of Houston. Yet, the city’s controversial One Bin for All recycling plan advisory committee is 80 percent white. It is hard to imagine how the nearly all-white One Bin committee can move forward in any credible way without the Mayor “fixing” the glaring omission of Hispanics on the advisory committee. This is not an insignificant point since Hispanics currently make up nearly half of the city’s population.

August 22, 2014

An Environmental Justice Analysis of Houston’s One Bin for All Recycling Plan

A detailed presentation examines the environmental justice implications of the One Bin for All plan in the context of Houston’s discriminatory waste facility siting pattern. From the 1970s to present, in no-zoning Houston, the city’s black and brown neighborhoods were “unofficially zoned for garbage.”

August 04, 2014

Houston Waste Summit Experts to Mayor: “Dump Experimental One-Bin Recycling Plan”

The Waste and Environmental Justice Summit was held this past Saturday at the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University. More than one hundred community and civic leaders attended the policy summit to hear from experts on recycling, waste and race, environmental justice and Houston’s controversial One Bin for All Recycling Plan.

July 20, 2014

Houston’s People of Color Neighborhoods “Unofficially Zoned” for Garbage

Zero Waste Houston Coalition will hold an Environmental Justice and Waste Summit on Saturday August 2 at the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University in Houston. The Summit organizers include local and national leaders who will present strategies to address race, waste and environmental justice issues in Houston. The Summit will bring special attention to Houston’s controversial “One Bin for All” trash recycling proposal which presents social environmental challenges by giving preference to siting a new waste facility in people of color neighborhoods. After more than three decades. some Houston residents may have to once again confront environmental racism.

July 10, 2014

Houston’s New Recycling Plan Gives Preference to Siting Waste Facility in Minority Areas

The Zero Waste Houston Coalition released a new report, “It’s Smarter to Separate: How Houston’s Trash Proposal Would Waste Our Resources, Pollute Our Air and Harm Our Community’s Health,” on the steps of City Hall. The report details environmental problems and challenges facing the One Bin for All experiment the City of Houston is considering to jumpstart its recycling program. It also documents the environmental justice and civil rights implications of the City giving preference to existing landfills for the location of its new One Bin for All waste facility. Houston since the 1920s has located its landfills, incinerators and garbage transfer stations exclusively in mostly African American and Latino neighborhoods.

October 18, 2013

Invisible Houston Revisited Policy Summit Rolled Out

The Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University rolled out the Invisible Houston Revisited webpage for its Policy Summit to be held on campus November 7, 2013. The one-day Summit focuses on various forms of inequality in the nation’s fourth largest city over the past three decades since research on my

March 11, 2013

Call for Papers Focuses on Black Houston Over Past Three Decades

The Barbara Jordan Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University (TSU) is calling for papers for its Invisible Houston Revisited Three Decades Later: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust Policy Summit and Book Project. The initiative follows up Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust(Texas A&M University Press 1987)

February 13, 2013

Black History Month: “Invisible Houston” Revisited Three Decades Later

As part of Black History Month this year, the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University kicks off Invisible Houston Revisited, an initiative that follows up Invisible Houston: The Black Experience in Boom and Bust, a book I wrote nearly three decades ago that critically examined the major demographic, social, economic,