2014: The Year of Fallen Environmental Justice Heroes and Sheroes

Categories: Blog

Damu Smith speaking at Environmental Justice Summit - 2002The Environmental Justice Movement in the United States is a relatively young movement.  The movement did not appear out of thin air but has a rich history built on the Civil Rights Movement.  Many of our young people do not know this history or its legacy.  Nor do they know much about the many unsung heroes and sheroes who dedicated their careers, made sacrifices, and fought racism, sexism, and classism in the pursuit of environmental justice for the most vulnerable in our society.

Although these brave souls are no longer with us physically, their legacy and spirit remain alive and well. As part of the national celebration of environmental justice, fallen warriors will be honored each month throughout 2014 as a tribute their unwavering pursuit of environmental justice for all.   A few of the environmental justice warriors who are no longer with us today and will be honored include: Dana Alston (Washington, DC), Luke Cole (San Francisco, CA), Jeanne Guana (Albuquerque, NM), Grover Hankins (Houston, TX), Harry Holt (Dickson, TN), Hazel Johnson (Chicago, IL), Edgar J. Mouton (Mossville, LA),  Patsy Ruth Oliver (Texarkana, TX), Damu Smith (Washington, DC); Emelda West (Convent, LA), and Margaret Louise Williams (Pensacola, FL).

We would like to honor as many unsung heroes and sheroes as possible.   Please send me (drrobertbullard@gmail.com) names and or profiles (with hyperlinks if available) of the fallen EJ warriors you would like to see profiled in 2014.


Author: Dr. Robert Bullard

Dr. Bullard is the lead author and principal investigator on several new book projects and research undertakings that address environmental health, energy, transportation, climate justice, and racial equity.

One Response to "2014: The Year of Fallen Environmental Justice Heroes and Sheroes"

  1. Jaime Posted on January 6, 2014 at 8:32 am

    In Canada, I would say the Environmental Rights movement started with Indigenous people. Sometimes what people consider a movement isn’t always seen in the ways Indigenous people live. A way of life can be a movement.

Leave a Reply